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Congratulation Princeton Community Middle School teacher Lincoln Cobb for being inducted into the Ohio Association of Track and Field/Cross County Coaches Hall of Fame

Lincoln Cobb


They say that when Albert Einstein died, he was still trying to figure out gravity. Shoot—all he
had to do was go to Pettisville High School and Lincoln Cobb could have helped him with that, or at
least with the part of how to overcome it.
Pettisville did not have a track of any type during Lincoln’s first three years of competition, so it
was pretty tough to work on the specifics of such a technical event as long jump. Despite this lack of
facilities, Lincoln won the State Champion title in the 1989 long jump as a sophomore and then came
back to repeat as State Champion as a junior. Also in his junior year, Lincoln qualified to the State
Meet in the 100M and 200M events where he qualified to the finals and finished third in both events
earning Pettisville a 3rd place team finish and just missing the podium.
Not bad for a kid with no track. What if he had the advantage that so many others take for granted?
To find out, the summer between his junior and senior year, Pettisville built an eight lane track &
field facility largely with the help of volunteer labor of which Lincoln and his dad put in more than
their share of man hours. And it paid off—
In 1991, Lincoln was again the only entrant in the Division III State Championship from Pettisville.
But—when you know how to beat gravity, one entrant is all you need. At the end of the day,
Lincoln had won the long jump for a third time, added another state title in the 100M, taken second in
the 200M, scored 28 points, and won the State Championship team trophy for Pettisville. Currently,
this 1991 trip to the podium is the only team title in Pettisville’s track & field history.
Lincoln’s 23’ 9¾” stood as a State Record until 2011 and his Miami University record jump of
24’ 5” stood until 2002. Final count: four championship titles, one runner-up title, and one team title.
Lincoln now lives in Mason, Ohio.

 

 

The OAT&CCC Hall of Fame is an impressive display of names and pictures of its members now featured at the Jesse
Owens Track Facility at Ohio State University. Inductees are also featured on the association website at http://oatccc.com.
Members of the Hall of Fame, as well as the Ed Barker Award winners, are voted on by the Executive Board who receive the
nominations from the district representatives.

 

Source:   January 2017, p.12, The Runner. Retrieved from http://www.oatccc.com/docs/the-runner/the-runner-clinic-edition-2017.pdf




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